Book trailer for Cold Blood: Yamabuki vs. the Sword Master

Cold Blood, Katherine M. Lawrence, Sword of the Taka Samurai

Hot off of After Effects, we present the first book trailer for Katherine M. Lawrence’s Cold Blood:

Video and music by Laura Lis Scott. What do you think?

In case you’re unfamiliar with Katherine’s work, Cold Blood begins the tale of 17-year-old Yamabuki, daughter of a warlord, trained in sword and bow, on her first solo mission—to deliver three scrolls to the Imperial City.

Cold Blood is a novella—a quick, sharp introduction to Yamabuki and the world in which she travels. But it is but the first story of the Sword of the Taka Samurai series.

Book two, Cold Rain, runs longer as Yamabuki, trying to fully understand the implications of what she’s learned and experienced, stumbles into circumstances beyond her control. At 83,000+ words, Cold Heart is a full-length novel about newfound love, danger, and a desperate fight for her life. Cold Trail, available for preorder and also novel length, continues the action as Yamabuki makes her way to Heian-kyĹŤ, a city in turmoil as clans vie for power, forging alliances.

You can read more about Yamabuki and 12th-century Japan on Katherine M. Lawrence’s blog.

The medieval Japan of Yamabuki

Authors

Today, Katherine M. Lawrence blogs a bit about Japan in 1172, when the events of Sword of the Taka Samurai take place. Take a peek.

Heroines of Fantasy review of Cold Blood

reviews

Carlyle Clark writes:

Still, at no time was I bored or worried that major conflict would not be forthcoming, in fact the pace of the story mirrored the feel of the times, which was probably and intentional choice by the author. I can’t tell you why I believe that because it would be a spoiler. In fact, revealing any of the interesting things would be spoilers because they are all weaved together to create a strong ending in which Lawrence was deft enough to play off of reader’s expectations (and my own personal fear this story might tread down the well-worn road toward a condescending but common type of development) to create surprises toward the end which makes me confident she knew what she was doing. You don’t write an excellent story by accident.

That’s just a snippet. Read the whole thing.